First visit to pediatric cardiologist

New patients come to us when a primary care physician notices something that needs evaluation by a pediatric cardiologist. Your child's doctor may have heard a heart murmur. Or, perhaps your son or daughter needs a special test.

Whatever the reason for your first appointment, you'll likely have many questions. We'll do our best to provide you with answers. It's natural to feel anxious the first time you and your child visit a pediatric cardiologist.

 Nervousness can make anyone forgetful, so before your appointment, take the time to prepare. Think about questions you want to ask, things you want to tell the doctor and other concerns you want to address with our staff. 

Here are some of the ways you can prepare for the first visit to a pediatric cardiologist:

Don't Hesitate to Ask Us for Help

We're here for support. When you make an appointment, we'll let you know what information you should bring. If you're uncertain about how to prepare, give us a call. We will gladly answer your questions. 

To learn more about how to prepare for an appointment, visit one of these pages:

  • Baby's first visit
  • Young child's first visit
  • Adolescent's first visit

Research Before Child's First Visit

Your pediatrician may have made a diagnosis or recommended tests for your child. Learn more about the condition or procedure. Our blog has information about heart murmurs, heart defects and various diagnostic tests.  

If you research elsewhere online, look at reputable sites. Here are sources of reliable information about congenital heart disease:

  • American Heart Association
  • Cove Point Foundation
  • American Academy of Pediatrics

 Learning more can help you prepare questions ahead of your visit. Take notes and make a list of questions for the pediatric cardiologist. Prioritize the list items. If you like, make an extra copy for the doctor and hand it to them during the appointment.

Ask a Family Member to Come With You

Many times, two parents accompany children to our office. If it's just you and your child, you can bring another adult with you if you want. A family member or friend is a comfort and a another set of ears and eyes.

Rehearse Your Questions

If you're a naturally shy person, you may find it difficult to speak up in the doctor's office. Even those who are not usually reticent can find themselves at a loss when worried about a child. Practice reading your questions aloud. 

Help Your Child Feel Relaxed 

Reassure your child before the visit. If your child is old enough to understand, explain in broad terms why they need an exam. Assure them that the tests won't hurt and that you'll be by their side. 

For young children, play doctor before the visit. Take turns being the patient and the pediatrician. Have fun and keep it playful. Bring to the appointment a toy, book or another item that provides comfort or entertainment. Let your child choose something to take.

At PCCO, we strive to provide a warm and welcoming atmosphere for children and their parents. Contact us here to make an appointment.